2017 Bill and Account Collectors
Median Pay: US$34,440
Entry Level: High school diploma or equivalent
Summary
Bill and account collectors try to recover payment on overdue bills. They negotiate repayment plans with debtors and help them find solutions to make paying their overdue bills easier.
Duties

Bill and account collectors typically do the following:

  • Find consumers and businesses who have overdue bills
  • Track down consumers who have an out-of-date address by using the Internet, post office, credit bureaus, or neighbors - a process called "skip tracing"
  • Inform debtors that they have an overdue bill and try to negotiate a payment
  • Explain the terms of sale or contract with the debtor, when necessary
  • Learn the reasons for the overdue bills, which can help with the negotiations
  • Offer credit advice or refer a consumer to a debt counselor, when appropriate

Bill and account collectors generally contact debtors by phone, although sometimes they do so by mail. They use computer systems to update contact information and record past collection attempts with a particular debtor. Keeping these records can help collectors with future negotiations.

The main job of bill and account collectors is finding a solution that is acceptable to the debtor and maximizes payment to the creditor. Listening to the debtor and paying attention to his or her concerns can help the collector negotiate a solution.

After the collector and debtor agree on a repayment plan, the collector continually checks to ensure that the debtor pays on time. If the debtor does not pay, the collector submits a statement to the creditor, who can take legal action. In extreme cases, this legal action may include taking back goods or disconnecting service.

Collectors must follow federal and state laws that govern debt collection. These laws require that collectors make sure they are talking with the debtor before announcing that the purpose of the call is to collect a debt. A collector also must give a statement, called "mini-Miranda," which informs the account holder that they are speaking with a bill or debt collector.

Although many collectors work for third-party collection agencies, some work in-house for the original creditor, such as a credit-card company or a health care provider. The day-to-day activities of in-house collectors are generally the same as those of other collectors.

Collectors usually have goals they are expected to meet. Typically, these include calls per hour and success rates.

Collections Supervisor

Type: Full Time, Full Time Alumnus
Job Summary:Supervises Collectors daily tasks to keep dept. on target.Keep Manager apprised when coverage is needed and/or fill in as necessary.Review accounts for bad debt.Audit accounts worked by Collectors and provide feedback.Responsible for accounts assigned as special projects.Responsible for...
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Central Billing Office Supervisor A/R Department (Collections Dept)

Type: Full Time, Full Time Alumnus
The A/R Supervisor, will work closely with the Collections Manager to oversee and direct the A/R (Collections) department team. His/her responsibilities include, but are not limited to:Supervises Collectors daily tasks to keep the department on target to achieve set goalsResponds to and answers...
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